The Divine Symphony

July 9, 2012 § 3 Comments

Scripture is like a symphony.  One does not listen to just one note or one measure or one chord or one theme.  Scripture vibrates and resonates.  There are echoes one can hear.  One musical instrument answering another.  Or questioning.  Cymbals clashing.  Silences.  Conversations.  The sounds of water.  Of trees rustling.  If you listen closely.  If you read with heart tuned.  Scripture arose through such a process.  And it remains alive for those who steep themselves (in it) as one steeps tea.

This morning I was reading Psalm 39 (40) – depending upon how one counts the psalms.  And I heard it speaking, not just to me, but to the end of John’s Gospel.   Or you could say I understood that the end of John’s Gospel was like an echo/commentary on verses of that psalm.  And hearing the melody gave me new insight into what the writer of John was doing.  For when one hears such a melody it is like a cue to await further reverberations hidden in both texts.

Origin was a master at this way of reading scripture.  Like someone weaving an exquisite tapestry, he moves back and forth throughout the entire Bible – using vibrant colored threads to create images and metaphors as he brings to life a text – through other texts.   He is both breathtaking and charming.  And I’ve only just begun to drink deeply at the wells he’s opened up, whose waters have seeped into much of spiritual and theological writing (in spite of his being martyred as a heretic).

But I digress…

Let’s start with the end of John’s Gospel.  Which is probably familiar to many.  Its final verse [John 21:25] reads:

But there are also many other things that Jesus did; if every one of them were written down, I suppose that the world itself could not contain the books that would be written.

And now listen to this verse from Psalm 40 (Grail Version):

6 How many, O LORD my God,

are the wonders and designs

that you have worked for us;

you have no equal.

Should I wish to proclaim or speak of them,

they would be more than I can tell!

Now, whether or not this is the real ending to John is not our concern here.  But this resonance between the Old and New Testaments, between prayer (the psalm) and announcing the Good News (the Gospel) is just one example of what occurs all over the place in scripture.  It is exactly the method the resurrected Christ taught the disciples on the Road to Emmaus.  A method clearly understood and practiced by Origin. 

John’s Gospel can usefully be read as a call to decision.  As a witness to events, which prompts a response.  Indeed its penultimate verse hints at a community which seems to endorse the Gospel writer as:  “the disciple who is testifying to these things and has written them, and we know that his testimony is true.”  A community of converts one has to assume.  Perhaps even a community whose members might have experienced conversion in the manner of psalm 40 [NRSV]:

1 I waited patiently for the Lord;
he inclined to me and heard my cry.
2 He drew me up from the desolate pit,
out of the miry bog,
and set my feet upon a rock,
making my steps secure.
3 He put a new song in my mouth,
a song of praise to our God.
Many will see and fear,
and put their trust in the Lord.

4 Happy are those who make
the Lord their trust,
who do not turn to the proud,
to those who go astray after false gods.
5 You have multiplied, O Lord my God,
your wondrous deeds and your thoughts towards us;
none can compare with you.
Were I to proclaim and tell of them,
they would be more than can be counted.

6 Sacrifice and offering you do not desire,
but you have given me an open ear.
Burnt-offering and sin-offering
you have not required.
7 Then I said, ‘Here I am;
in the scroll of the book it is written of me.
8 I delight to do your will, O my God;
your law is within my heart.’

9 I have told the glad news of deliverance
in the great congregation;
see, I have not restrained my lips,
as you know, O Lord.
10 I have not hidden your saving help within my heart,
I have spoken of your faithfulness and your salvation;
I have not concealed your steadfast love and your faithfulness
from the great congregation.

11 Do not, O Lord, withhold
your mercy from me;
let your steadfast love and your faithfulness
keep me safe for ever.
12 For evils have encompassed me
without number;
my iniquities have overtaken me,
until I cannot see;
they are more than the hairs of my head,
and my heart fails me.

13 Be pleased, O Lord, to deliver me;
O Lord, make haste to help me.
14 Let all those be put to shame and confusion
who seek to snatch away my life;
let those be turned back and brought to dishonour
who desire my hurt.
15 Let those be appalled because of their shame
who say to me, ‘Aha, Aha!’

16 But may all who seek you
rejoice and be glad in you;
may those who love your salvation
say continually, ‘Great is the Lord!’
17 As for me, I am poor and needy,
but the Lord takes thought for me.
You are my help and my deliverer;
do not delay, O my God.

I hope perhaps this psalm may be your guide to a closer reading of John’s Gospel (and its impact on you).  Just as Luke’s story of the disciples on the Road to Emmaus (and their subsequent carrying of Jesus’ message back to Jerusalem) resonates like an opening theme or interpretive key – for the Gospel it immediately precedes.   Opening our eyes to the fact that nothing in scripture stands by itself.

This is just one tiny example of the power of the Divine Symphony which plays in Scripture.  And of which we ourselves are a part.  We too are words spoken by our Creator.  Notes in the cosmic symphony.  Like musical instruments awaiting the Spirit’s breath to come to life.   Exactly as the psalmist did in the words above.

3 He put a new song in my mouth,
a song of praise to our God.

Advertisements

§ 3 Responses to The Divine Symphony

  • Robert Helfman says:

    I am new to this site, having read a post from July 9th, 2009, a link from NCR online. I like the meditative comments on scripture readings. Also, having a degree in music therapy I find the nom-de-plume catchy. I wonder about TheraP’s musical background. It is, I surmise, quite sophisticated.

    • TheraP says:

      Dear Robert,

      The conclusions you draw are interesting. I’m not sure how sophisticated my background is, but I have played several instruments (most of which I taught myself) and I have a wide range of music that I love. Either classical or ethnic/spiritual in the widest sense. I’m feeling my way toward a sense of each of us as an “instrument” which, if “tuned” to the Trinity’s energies (another term for grace), with our lamps lit or carrying our fuel, so to speak, hopefully we are “ready” to respond to the Breath of the Spirit with our specific note or chord or theme or maybe a “hush” or clashing of cymbals… could be anything. But our task, I think, is to accept ourselves, our genetics, our experiences in life, our traits (both good and bad), all our feelings… in other words to accept the “shape” of our “instrument” – which is how our “spiritual sound” resonates …

      If I ever get to it, which may be soon… it will be posted at Nothingness, which may interest you as well. It’s where I put more personal stuff, including personal musings, and to make a long story short, I have found that my work (first as a teacher, later as a therapist – now retired) has been powerfully intermixed with spirituality. Indeed, just writing this jogs some thoughts loose in my brain… which I may ultimately put up there as well.

      It is only recently that I’ve realized that the “grace note” I chose quite some time ago is like something that arose from my unconscious… as an “identifier” for myself. And this identification goes so far back in my life….

      Thanks for reading! And for being such an intuitive reader as well! May you be richly blessed!

      One final thought: There’s research to show that psychologists have very similar “interest profiles” to musicians.

  • […] is so rich!  As I’ve said before, it’s like a symphony, a harmonic whole, conversing with […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

What’s this?

You are currently reading The Divine Symphony at Casting Words to the Wind.

meta

%d bloggers like this: